team buildingIn our blog about enjoying summer as a company, we mentioned that Core3 would be taking an evening trip to the zoo. Last week, some of Core3’s staffers met at the Detroit Zoo for an evening of animals, laughter and lessons. You see, here at Core3 we strive to learn lessons from every situation – including a trip to the zoo. Our culture events give us the opportunity to hang out outside of the office and work on team building in an exciting environment.

Lessons learned from our recent zoo trip:

Everyone has their own style; it’s important to adapt.

As a zoo member, I have a typical route that I explore while at the zoo. However, after getting in to the zoo I quickly realized that there was no reason to stick to my usual path in the zoo. There were seven adults on our zoo venture. Each had preferred animals they wished to see. Adapting to a new path allowed me to see animals that I sometimes miss.

While working on a project, it’s easy to be stubborn and proclaim that things must be done a specific way. However, working as a team can often accomplish things more quickly and efficiently. Listen to the ideas of those around you and you may find their way is actually better than yours. Rather than fight a coworker on an idea or how to do things, try listening to their suggestions and working as a team. It is a lot less frustrating and often an enlightening way to complete a task.

Everyone has their strengths; embrace them.

Because I am a frequent zoo visitor, I know an unusual amount of information about the zoo and its animals. Paul also visits the zoo regularly because it’s a great opportunity to spend time with his family, including his two-year-old twins. I enjoyed answering my coworker’s questions about the animals, while Paul led the way to his favorite exhibits and shared his knowledge on the zoo. And when we got a bit turned around, Jason happily stepped in and looked at the zoo map to point us in the right direction. Throughout our travels, Liz took pictures of everything soteam building we could remember the enjoyable evening. Each individual brought something different to the trip and we had a great time because of it. And thanks to Liz, we have these delightful pictures for this blog!

When working as a team, it’s important to understand what each person’s strengths are. This will allow the project manager or management team to assign tasks accordingly. Though one individual may always do a particular task, it’s a good idea to consider the ideas and strengths of others. Even if there is a particular project you have your heart set on assisting with – it’s important to realize when you are not the best person to complete that task. Embrace the strengths of those around you.

Team building can be done in a variety of ways.

Team building is important. Our employees are the backbone of everything we do. If we want to succeed, we must work as a team. The various culture events we partake in increase our team building skills and give us a higher sense of appreciation for one another. Some people may laugh at our arcade games, pool table and company outings. Others probably question why we want to spend time together – even after the work day has ended. The truth is – we enjoy each other’s company. Spending time with each other outside of work gives us the opportunity to unwind, relax and just have fun. Those stress-relieving moments are reflected when we sit at our team buildingdesks to complete client work. We trust each other. We value the opinions of our coworkers. And we aren’t afraid to ask for help.

There are plenty of boring team building activities out there. However, participating in enjoyable events will give your staffers the opportunity to really each themselves. This will be reflected in your team’s ability to work well together.

Working well as a team is imperative to conduct a successful workplace. What team building activities does your company participate in?

For your entertainment, enjoy this video we took of Jason and Paul at the prairie dog exhibit:

 

 

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Jennifer Cline

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